Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Racism and Toxic Masculinity


Most Humanists share a strong interest in understanding the world to be instrumental in making it a better place for us all.  An open minded search often leads us to unexpected perspectives that may be difficult to grasp or dismiss without further discussion.  Our approach is always questioning further and looking deeper.  Sometimes alone, in the dead of night and sometimes  with like minded Humanists or others with conflicting ideas.  The one and greatest pitfall in navigating information is our confirmation biases that can hold us back.

What is 'Confirmation Bias'
"A psychological phenomenon that explains why people tend to seek out information that confirms their existing opinions and overlook or ignore information that refutes their beliefs. Confirmation bias occurs when people filter out potentially useful facts and opinions that don’t coincide with their preconceived notions. It affects perceptions and decision making in all aspects of our lives and can cause us to make less-than-optimal choices. Seeking out people and publications with different opinions than our own can help us overcome confirmation bias and make better-informed"

Would you like 'Confirmation Bias' to be a separate blog subject from Racism and Toxic Masculinity?  Please let us know.

Please click on the link below, take the time to listen to the panel and share your thoughts with our readers.  You may do this anonymously.  

"Racism and toxic masculinity are pervasive hallmarks of our culture. This panel will examine how these manifest and how they can be uprooted to stem the rise of militarism and global violence."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNTPrI7xpOY

5 comments:

  1. cannot click on...link is not highlighted.

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  2. But thank you for the very important message of 'confirmation bias'.

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  3. "There are facts, and there are beliefs, and there are things you want so badly to believe that they become as facts to you."
    Here is further interesting reading on Confirmation Bias..
    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/03/this-article-wont-change-your-mind/519093/

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  4. Thank you. This may be our next subject of discussion, if no one comes up with anything better here.

    ReplyDelete